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…whatever their grievances may be, they’re wrong. Progressive Rock band YES' discography of live and studio albums. The stark contrast between this and the title track feels a little odd in terms of album flow, but both stand out individually. In spite of the obvious lack of inspiration and synergy, Tormato still manages to be a fairly engaging and surprisingly under-appreciated record, although the band’s better bouts continue to weigh heavily against it by comparison. Home / YES DISCOGRAPHY / YES – The Studio Albums 1969-1987 The Studio Albums 1969-1987 sees YES ‘ legendary Atlantic years revisited in a 13-CD boxed set featuring remastered and expanded versions of the band’s studio albums. Unlike their more timeless prog classics, Yes feels very much a work of its time. Surprisingly, the musician who impresses me the most here is Peter Banks, a guitarist that time seems to have forgotten under the shadow of Yes‘ canonical riffmaker Steve Howe. Although undeniably rooted within prog rock territory, The Yes Album is an incredibly accessible album. For proof of the string section’s potential in Yes‘ music, just listen to the way it accentuates the instrumentation on “The Prophet” or the title track. It’s too mellow to have warranted Atlantic Records‘ decision to use it as a single, but it wraps up the epic with a signature tenderness the rest of the work was intentionally left without. Yes seemed to get the message, and decided to turn their sound around for the better. Released 29 January 1971 on Atlantic (catalog no. It’s this sort of artistic division that first sent Yes on the downward slope with Tormato, and Big Generator saw fit to reproduce this scenario with their pop era. Some rose-tinted listeners went as far to say it ranked up there with the band’s classic material. Thanks in large part to Patrick Moraz‘s recent addition to the band as keyboardist (Wakeman had grown tired of the band’s direction on Tales from Topographic Oceans and made like a tree), there is a strong jazz fusion kick to the music, in a space that would have usually Wakeman‘s high classical influence. When the band brings the chaos down to earth a couple of minutes in and goes for a more typical sort of focus, the melodies and symphonic warmth are refreshing, thanks in large part to the jarring contrast. The upbeat, central theme “We Can Fly” stands as arguably being the most memorable and immediate single Yes have crafted since “Owner of a Lonely Heart.” It’s pleasantly contrasted by the more in-depth and melancholic “Sad Night at the Airfield” which, in turn, is sent up by the quirky pace and tone of “Madman at the Screens.” The whole thing is held together by the overture and reprise, which draw ideas from the three central parts in a fairly satisfying way. Yes‘ sound is usually padded with symphonic warmth, but here, the instrumentation is cutting and sharp. Was I right? Yes weren’t as refined circa 1970 as they would be with their canonical masterpieces, but to hear a band with such an apparent motivation to aspire and improve is a treat of its own. Bringing in a little known New Wave pair called the Buggles (who enjoyed a bit of success with their 1980 debut The Age of Plastic) seems like a big risk to have taken, even now. For all of the things that the band does right on Drama, so much more gets lost along the way. Like Yes‘ first two albums, Tormato seems to have flown under the radar, even for many otherwise-hardcore Yes fans. Before the notion was rightly dismissed by the others, Jon Anderson was said to have expressed a wish to record Tales from Topographic Oceans in the middle of a forest at nighttime. Magnification I like a lot but I think there’s maybe a few others I would put a bit higher. I think the thing that’s missing most in retrospect is Steve Howe‘s unique fingerstyle, but it’s also clearly a case of a band needing time and experience before making a bolder statement. By contrast, Yes opens up the scope once again on Tales, no by continuing to up the density in their sound as they had been doing for their career up ’til now, but by relaxing the measurements of time and giving compositions air to breathe. If any of classic members truly benefited from the newfound pop leanings on 90125, it would be Anderson. The remix is by no means flawless enough to be the new “definitive” edition of the album, but it has enough changes to warrant a check-out from veterans and newcomers alike. From the start, “Close to the Edge” forgoes conventions that were commonplace in prog rock epics even by 1972. It’s surprising that so many Yes fans have never bothered to check them out. In so many ways, Magnification rides on the precedent set by The Ladder. There was no doubt Close to the Edge enjoyed sophistication and depth that made most rock music look neanderthal by comparison, but I couldn’t help but feel that the album feel far short of its reputation as a masterpiece to trump all others. …well, maybe they are right, but Tales from Topographic Oceans‘ opaque self-awareness and bombast don’t stop it from being one of the most incredible albums ever made in progressive rock, and quite possibly even Yes‘ finest hour. Rated #25 in the best albums of 1971, and #670 of all-time album.. Genres: Progressive Rock, Symphonic Prog, Pop Rock. Yes have let themselves fall into a disappointing AOR snag, but that’s nothing new for them. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Yes. There is a sense here that Yes are piggybacking on the tailends of the dwindling hippie movement. My first impression to consider the shorter pieces as interludes was sorely mistaken in any case; they may be short, but each track makes a clear statement of its own. Even in progressive rock, where this degree of complexity is often a mandate, I find myself hard-pressed to think of a few other albums that have this much depth and engagement in the performance. Even if Jon Anderson‘s performance here retains its trademark optimism, the mood is instantly tense; the tempo is fed with a drive and expedience far removed from the leisurely pace of Tales from Topographic Oceans, as if the music has been spurned forth on a forced military march into battle. It’s really unfortunate that the song doesn’t serve to ultimately do something with that momentum; before long, the chaos has died down, leaving Howe to noodle away at an extended solo with no accompaniment, somewhere along the lines of what Led Zeppelin‘s Jimmy Page may have done live during a twenty minute instrumental break. Don’t get me wrong; Close to the Edge was as impressive as albums come, and well-deserving of its status as Yes‘ de facto “essential” album, but with Relayer, they took the formula and went somewhere even more exciting with it. I’ve had it playing in my car for 8 months now. My top three favorites also and in that order probably. Yes Albums. They signed with Atlantic in early 1969, and entered Advision and Trident Studios in London to record their first album. If anything, it’s that quality that makes the album (among) the best this band has ever done. It wasn’t supposed to be a Yes album per se; rather, Chris Squire and the much-loathed personnel addition Billy Sherwood outlined this material for a new project. Early ‘90s saw all of the present and past members reunited for lukewarm Union, with the following two releases reaching the absolute bottom. Listening to Tormato, I get the mental image of a band of musicians playing with their backs turned to one another- there’s the general impression they’re working together towards the same goal, but there’s no collusion or chemistry between any pair of musicians here. There are places where the string section gets overzealous (a great song is hiding somewhere in “Clear Days” for example, but the prominent string section sounds aimless) but it does give Time and a Word a unique sound—Yes wouldn’t try this again until their nineteenth album, Magnification, in 2001. The album was the first by the group comprised solely of original material. YES relayer, gatefold, K50096. Going for the One is the eighth studio album by English progressive rock band Yes, released on 15 July 1977 by Atlantic Records. Even in their unabridged forms, “Starship Trooper” and “I’ve Seen All Good People” have the potential to instantly stick in a casual listener’s mind. After forming in mid-1968, the band toured extensively across the United Kingdom with sets formed of original material and rearranged cover versions. If there’s anything Yes‘ latest disasterpiece Heaven and Earth has taught me, it’s that I will always prefer a solid pop album over a dogshit prog one. If the epic cornerstone of Close to the Edge had married rock and classical music together in some glorious fusion, “The Gates of Delirium” added jazz to the melting pot. As far as the title track is concerned, Yes manage to make this backscaling of their sound really work. Magnification, then, is the next logical evolution in this short Yes renaissance. KING CRIMSON Add More Dates to North American Tour, Bandcamp Undercover: Moon Machine – Left to Wander [SINGLE]. The thing that hurts Open Your Eyes moreso than any other album in the band’s discography is the songwriting itself. Yes‘ transition on 90125 has made it the most polarizing album among fans after Tales from Topographic Oceans. After all, given time and patience, I was even able to find some things to love about the unpopular Big Generator, and there are just enough hints of the ‘old’ Yes here to have piqued my interest. Clearly, the honeymoon period brought on by Trevor Rabin was over by this point; Tony Kaye and Trevor Horn had been at each other’s throats, and Jon Anderson was expressing doubt around the direction the band was taking. No. No. The comparisons between Fly From Here and Drama don’t end with irregular vocalists. Albums by Yes Main Releases Play The Royal Affair Tour (Live in Las Vegas) Yes Play Canciones para Cuarentena Después de Cuarentena Yes Play Yes 50 Live Yes Play Live at Glastonbury Festival 2003 Yes Play Live At The Apollo Yes Play The Steven Wilson Remixes Yes Play I know many Yes albums don’t consider Fragile to be top three or even top five but I sure do. Yes' Steve Howe Still Loves the Guitar, Won't Be Sunbathing on the Yes Cruise ; Album … Time and a Word is, in many ways, typical for a band’s second album. In 2017 Yes was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; the celebration was also an inauguration for the former members of the band—Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman—to start working under the name Yes Featuring ARW. Such is the way Yes open up their classic fourth album Fragile and their perennial fan favourite “Roundabout.” The song itself is probably the greatest piece of radio coverage the progressive rock genre ever received, and still rightly stands as one of the best pieces from the band’s catalogue. Quite a few of the songs here are otherwise well written: “Onward” and “Madrigal” are two beautiful ballad-type tracks, and “Don’t Kill the Whale” features some great melodic writing—I understand it became a minor hit for the band. Audio CD £5.96 £ 5. Although the focus remains almost always on the band themselves, these songs were clearly written with enough “fill in the blanks” room for Groupë to make the orchestral contribution relevant. While it probably sounded like a great way to merge the merits of both eras on paper, the album itself give the impression that it was a misguided decision at best. In the context of Yes‘ career as a whole, Time and a Word is a transition piece, elevating the band from the psychedelic organ rock of the self-titled into something more ambitious and nuanced—Time and a Word would start a streak of ambitious symphonic prog that would last a decade. A more tender acoustic piece in the style of “And You And I” or “To Be Over,” it’s one of the most beautiful things Yes have ever done. I’m in complete agreement except I would switch GOING FOR THE ONE to #3. This high regard was sharp contrast to the hideously sell-outish album art, which may very well be one of the least appealing covers I’ve ever seen. I think Howe as a replacement brought something far more special to the table, but Banks‘ own contributions to Yes‘ career have gone sorrowfully underrated. It wasn’t supposed to be a Yes album per se; rather, Chris Squire and the much-loathed personnel addition Billy Sherwood outlined this material for a new project. I’m up in the air whether the declawed anthem rock they’re going for on Open Your Eyes is worse than the first half of Talk, but Talk at least offered the amazing suite “Endless Dream” to make the grinding worth it. The vocals may still seem a bit drowned out in the sonic chaos, but the infectious catchiness and energy was more than enough to win me over. We see plenty of films where a brilliant “outside the box” madman is reduced to a docile wreck in a mental institution, be it a result of medication or a lobotomy. Yes is a solid psych rock album, with strong melodies and tight musicianship; what more could a listener ask for? Rather than capitalize on the “best of both worlds” as Union was no doubt supposed to, the strongest suits of Yes‘ prog and pop halves alike have been dulled to make room for one another. but—as was the case with Close to the Edge—the overture eventually consolidates itself into a firmer structure to accommodate Anderson‘s vocals. He has proved his ear for production and mastering countless times before, and Close to the Edge is no different. Though still in the midst of its golden peak, progressive rock was already beginning to get comfortable with its own set of conventions. Like the proggy-mellow dichotomy enjoyed between “Siberian Khatru” and “And You And I” respectively on Close to the Edge, these two pieces contrast each other, this time to an even greater degree. Maybe number six for me. Siberian Khatru - 03:4703. With Going for the One, it was clear that the proggy fervour was cooling off—punk was famously being said to have killed off prog, and a zeitgeist of once progressive bands giving up their mellotrons and moogs for three minute pop songs was right around the corner. From the onset, it’s clear they are sisters; both of them are alike in their beauty, intelligence and sophistication. Imagine you are somewhere, whereupon you meet two beautiful women. Whereas so much of Yes‘ post-Drama material is cumulatively shat upon by their fans and critics, the short period beginning with their Keys to Ascension duology and ending with Magnification escaped the brunt of the storm. The Yes Album is the third studio album by English progressive rock band Yes, released on 19 February 1971 by Atlantic Records. Yes (or whatever you’d like to call ‘em nowadays) have created merely a shadow of progressive rock, one with all of the toys and trinkets of the genre, but none of the sophistication we would normally look for in it. All the singles and albums of YES, peak chart positions, career stats, week-by-week chart runs and latest news. Although Jon didn’t get his wish to record their sixth LP out in the woods with the owls and squirrels, Yes instead decorated their studio to make it look more like a farmyard. The introduction to “Sound Chaser” is pretty mind-blowing and surprising, especially upon first hearing it. With Close to the Edge, Yes‘ writing had been condensed, with a clear regard for the economy of time. While nothing on Fly From Here reaches the heights of “Machine Messiah” or “Tempus Fugit,” it’s a far more consistent record than Drama ever was. The Yes Album (Expanded) by Yes | 2003. In spite of a few weak tracks, The Ladder aptly demonstrated that Yes were still capable of releasing great prog in their fourth decade of existence. I hear that seeing King Crimson perform compelled Yes to brush up their skills and push the envelope; whatever the case, it worked to their benefit. As is the case with every less-favoured Yes record, there are a few worthy gems, but it’s not enough to compensate for Union‘s lack of focus and appalling inconsistency. Pushing the boundaries further past Close to the Edge and creating a double album four epics long resulted in the most critically polarizing progressive rock album ever made. Yes have never shirked away from the risk and rewards an epic potentially offers, and even during their otherwise weakest moments (such as Talk), they’ve managed to do some pretty great things with longform composition. Of the album’s nine tracks, only four of them might be considered self-standing songs, and only three of those (excluding “Long Distance Runaround”) feel like well-rounded prog tunes. The Keys to Ascension duology gave some strong hopes that Yes were going to push their career forward post-Rabin with some strong new material, but Open Your Eyes shows the band unsure of where they want to go. I could still point the finger at any of the three albums Yes would release following this as the best of their career, but Fragile marks the band’s destined ascent into the realm of mastery. Very fascinating round up of YES. Even “Sound Chaser,” when overlooked for its obvious structural weakness, has the ability to surprise and shock more than most more conventionally structured works in prog rock. Today, I can look back and understand why the album’s orchestral density and blocky flow may have made it a slow grower for me initially, but time and experience with Close to the Edge has seen me fall in line with the legions of proggers that sing its praises. Without that stress on the composition’s back, new territories are more capably explored. This followed the departures of Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman after numerous attempts to record a new album in Paris and London had failed. Shop Yes Album by Yes. Yes have proved a clichéd expression true—it turns out there is such a thing as too many cooks in a kitchen. We use cookies and similar tools to enhance your shopping experience, to provide our services, understand how customers use our services so we can make improvements, and display ads. Fragile is the fourth studio album by the English progressive rock band Yes, released on 26 November 1971 by Atlantic Records. The Yes Album negates darkness entirely with its atmosphere. In any case, Larry Groupë orchestral arrangements here proved to be a wonderful surprise. Stream ad-free or purchase CD's and MP3s now on Amazon. No. The epic’s beautiful denouement “Soon” is a steep contrast to the chaos it succeeds. Since the underwhelming mess Union at the start of the decade, the band had been suffering through a crisis of identity—it wasn’t altogether clear where they could go now that the refined pop rock of 90125 and Big Generator had gone out of style. I have a soft spot for Big Generator too even though it typically doesn’t rank very high. I’m also glad to see TALES get the high grades it so richly deserves. “To Be Over” honestly bored me when I first heard it, but it’s one of the most tender things Yes ever created. It wouldn’t be fair to call Heaven and Earth a pop rock album, although part of me would like to. Even on the most disastrous albums (their latest one included), there were always a handful of tracks that stood out, at least a passage or two that stuck after the record ended. Although progressive rock has been marching onward for what is now close to half a century, the genre had already reached an outstanding maturity and familiarity by 1972. I would like to call “New State of Mind” and the catchy title track the highlights of the album (which they are), but those songs would have felt lacklustre even on Big Generator or Union. It’s undeniably more uneven and rough than its spiritual predecessor, but that’s part of what makes it so damned good; this is Yes at their most uncompromisingly creative. Regardless, the replacement for Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman (Trevor Horn and Geoffrey Downes, respectively) made for a decent fit. All rights reserved. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Nice job. What was it someone said about absence making the heart grow fonder? Or £8.99 to buy MP3 album. There had been personal differences arising in the band since Tales from Topographic Oceans, and combined with their conflicts of artistic vision and a greater level of alcohol consumption than should normally be attributed to a progressive rock act, suffice to say there was a steady foundation for things to fall apart. Yes discography and songs: Music profile for Yes, formed July 1968. “Sound Chaser” does get back on its feet in time, but there are a few minutes there that feel too aimless for their own good. Its follow-up, Big Generator, recorded in a long and tedious process, and eventually released 4 years after its predecessor, found itself on the opposite side. As it so appears, diamonds aren’t the only gems to be forged from pressure. I was excited to find out what I’d think of it—after all, it couldn’t be any worse than Union… Right? As much as I preferred Yes‘ prog side over the later pop, Trevor Rabin was a clever songwriter and leader for the band. Even compared to their other post-70s epics, “Fly From Here” is irregular. It’s undeniably a weaker album than 90125, even possibly the first album the band released I might consider truly weak. Many of the title piece’s instrumental sections sound like they could have been spawned from a miraculously devised improvisation; each instrument fills their side of the sound with a groove and rhythm of its own. Drama is the tenth studio album by the English progressive rock band Yes, released on 18 August 1980 by Atlantic Records.It is their first album to feature Trevor Horn on lead vocals and Geoff Downes on keyboards. Over the years they have released 21 studio albums, 14 live albums, 35 compilation albums, 28 singles and 22 videos. Looking at the performance credits on the album is enough to give anyone a headache; Trevor Rabin, Alan White and Tony Kaye (for example) are responsible for tracks 4, 6, 7 and 9, and their earlier counterparts are responsible for the rest. Fragile (1971) A crescendo draws steadily out of my set of speakers. “The Gates of Delirium” opens up sounding remarkably spacey (even by Yes‘ standards!) Greatness has to start somewhere, and though Yes have long since earned a place in the pantheon of prog rock legend, there was in fact a time when Yes found themselves in troubled waters. The fresh studio material on both Keys to Ascension 1 + 2 was well-intentioned and proggy, but lacked soul and inspiration. Whereas most symphonic prog makes use of synthesizers to get the “symphonic” element across, Time and a Word hosts a full string section. Unlike Rabin‘s contributions throughout the ‘80s and early ‘90s, you’ll find very few interesting hooks or melodic lines on Open Your Eyes. 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